Gut instinct

Always trust your gut instinct

Always trust your gut instinct

 

The last days of August and the first few days of September have a special place in the year. Juxtaposed between the August bank holiday in the UK and Labour day in the United States, they herald both the end of summer and the promise of autumn with its harvest rewards.

Earlier in the month I recommended The Hidden Half of Nature: The Microbial Roots of Life and Health by David R. Montgomery & Anne Biklé. An incredibly well researched yet accessible story, it explores how our understanding of microbes is transforming the way we see nature and our own bodies, as well as explaining how this could revolutionise agriculture and medicine.

Now, as we anticipate our busy lives springing back into action, for those shortening autumn evenings consider adding another book to your ‘essential reading’ list, Gut: the inside story of our body’s most under-rated organ by Giulia Enders.

Enders book is engaging, informative and entertaining about a subject that could easily be boring, tedious, never mind embarrassing. Enabling the reader to further comprehend (and place in context) the macro-micro issues highlighted in The Hidden Half of Nature, thanks to Enders huge enthusiasm for her subject, combined with an endearing eagerness to share her knowledge, she manages to create an inspiring read that will genuinely surprise you as you discover how much we depend upon this under-rated organ.

One of the most complex, important, and extraordinary parts of our anatomy, science is only just beginning to appreciate quite how much it has to offer and just how much we depend upon it. As the book explains, new research shows that gut bacteria can play a role in everything from obesity and allergies to Alzheimer’s. You come away convinced that the gut is every bit as important as our brain or heart and indeed in some ways even more so, because of the impact it can have upon both. Explaining everything from the basics of nutrient absorption to the latest science linking bowel bacteria with depression, if ever a book will make you appreciate the importance of what you choose to eat, this is it.

Learn why you really should trust your gut.

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          About the author
Iris is the driving force behind No Targets and a dedicated campaigner for real foods. Having spent years reading research on food she believes what we eat is more important than the calories we consume or burn. “It's about calculating nutrition, not counting calories.”

Iris is the driving force behind No Targets and a dedicated campaigner for real foods. Having spent years reading research on food she believes what we eat is more important than the calories we consume or burn. “It’s about calculating nutrition, not counting calories.”

Trillions of microbes in our intestinal tract profoundly impact our lives by digesting our food, regulating the immune system and transmitting signals to the brain that alter mood and behaviour.

Our mighty microbes
Cheese, please!

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